Max and Moritz prize

Published On May 2, 2012 | By Joe Gordon | Awards, Comics

The shortlist for this year’s Max und Moritz prize, the pre-eminent German language comics award, has been announced, with some twenty five titles contending for the gongs:

Alois Nebel by Jaroslav Rudiš and Jaromír 99 (Translation: Eva Profousová. Verlag Voland & Quist)

Alte Meister by Nicolas Mahler, adapted from Thomas Bernhard (Suhrkamp Verlag)

Annas Paradies by Daniel Schreiber (Splitter Verlag)

Asterios Polyp by David Mazzucchelli (Translation: Thomas Pletzinger. Eichborn Verlag)

Aufzeichnungen aus Jerusalem by Guy Delisle (Translation: Martin Budde. Reprodukt)

Baby Blues by Rick Kirkman und Jerry Scott (Translation: Michael Bregel. Bulls Press / Achterbahn im Lappan Verlag)

Castro by Reinhard Kleist (Carlsen Verlag)

Das tapfere Prinzlein und die sieben Zwergbären by Émile Bravo (Translation: Ulrich Pröfrock. Carlsen Verlag)

Dédé – Eriks Detektiv Deschamps by Erik (Epsilon Verlag) > nominated by the audience

Der Mann, der seinen Bart wachsen ließ by Olivier Schrauwen (Translation: Helge Lethi. Reprodukt)

Der Staub der Ahnen by Felix Pestemer (avant-verlag)

Die Ballade von Seemann und Albatros by Nick Hayes (Translation: Henning Ahrens. mareverlag)

Essex County by Jeff Lemire (Translation: Thomas Schützinger. Edition 52)

Fennek by Lewis Trondheim and Yoann (Translation: Kai Wilksen. Reprodukt)

Fünftausend Kilometer in der Sekunde by Manuele Fior (Translation: Maya della Pietra. avant-verlag)

Gaza by Joe Sacco (Translation: Christoph Schuler. Edition Moderne)

Grablicht by Daniela Winkler (Droemer Knaur) > nominated by the audience
Haarmann by Peer Meter and Isabel Kreitz (Carlsen Verlag)

Lou! by Julien Neel (Translation: Thomas Schöner. Tokyopop)

Packeis by Simon Schwartz (avant-verlag)

Pluto by Naoki Urasawa adapted from Osamu Tezuka. Co-Author: Takashi Nagasaki (Translation: Jürgen Seebeck. Carlsen Verlag)

Riekes Notizen by Barbara Yelin (Frankfurter Rundschau)

Schöne Töchter by Flix (Der Tagesspiegel)

Summer Wars by Mamoru Hosoda, Iqura Sugimoto and Yoshiyuki Sadamoto (Translation: Nadine Stutterheim. Carlsen Verlag)

The Walking Dead by Robert Kirkman, Charlie Adlard and Cliff Rathburn (Translation: Marc-Oliver Frisch. Cross Cult) > nominated by the audience

Twenty two of the shortlist nominees were selected by a jury, three by public vote. The special Max und Moritz Lifetime Achievement Award goes to a long-time favourite of mine, the great Lorenzo Mattotti; of the Italian maestro’s work the award organisers said his “genre-crossing body of work is one of the most influential and versatile in comics today.”

Great to see Mattotti honoured and also to see a good mix in the main shortlist of translated work and original German language titles – how nice to see an award that will consider Robert Kirkman, Lewis Trondheim, Olivier Schrauwen, Émile Bravo, Reinhard Kleist, Jeff Lemire and Guy Delisle in the same ballot, that’s a pretty diverse list. Also rather chuffed for debut graphic novelist Nick Hayes – I really enjoyed Nick’s huge Rime of the Modern Mariner published by Cape last year and was delighted to get to meet him in person at the Edinburgh Book Festival, now I see his work is also on the Max und Moritz shortlist, not bad for a first graphic novel!

Edinburgh International Book Festival - Nick Hayes & William Goldsmith 010
(Nick Hayes, on the left, with William Goldsmith at the 2011 Edinburgh International Book Festival, pic from my Flickr)

Other awards to contend for on the night include “Best German Comic”, “Best International Comic”, “Best Comic-Strip”, “Best German Comics Artist”, “Best Student Comics Publication” and “Best Children’s Comic”. This year’s “Max und Moritz” Gala will be hosted by Hella von Sinnen and Christian Gasser, the winners being announced at the 15th Erlangen International Comic Salon on June 8th. (thanks to my colleague Iz for translating and clarifying some pieces!)

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About The Author

Joe Gordon
Joe Gordon is ForbiddenPlanet.co.uk's chief blogger, which he set up in 2005. Previously, he was professional bookseller for over 12 years as well as a lifelong reader and reviewer, especially of comics and science fiction works.

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